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Pilot 'shortage' a govt created problem

Nearly 60 years ago United was offering training to those that had the PPL..

Weapons have improved.

it used to take multiple flights of bombers with fighter escorts to take out a bridge.

Now it’s one flight = no bridge .

Likely without a pilot too!
 
BananAppeal had a regional flight, KSAF to KDEN, cancelled today. United blamed lack of crew.

 
Interesting choice of verb: blame. Did you suspect some other reason?
 
I’m sure that if most of us had a kid the that finished college / training and had to wait

4 or 5 years years to begin a decent paying job we would suggest another field. And this

takes place about the time of starting a family.

The “ Colgan/3407” accident is partly to blame for the current state of affairs.

Many students reconsidered their career when realizing they would need 1500 hrs

to move forward.

IMHO - Hours were not a factor here. Training and professionalism IS.
 
Interesting how the tables have turned from this original 2014 post to today, 2023. This can be said of a lot of career fields, though. Look at the state of affairs for quality mechanics (auto and airplane), plumbers, electricians, home builders, etc. Basically all trades. Next time you bring your car into the shop look at the hourly rate. Don’t forget the outrageous part markups too. It is necessary to cover all the costs.

An entire generation was raised that didn’t want to get their hands dirty or go into a field that was stigmatized with low pay and “uneducated” people. Little do people realize that to work in a lot of the trades you now have to obtain specialized education and skills. Supply and demand, supply and demand. Economics 101, first day.
 
My thought is not to blame the kids for the situation but rather the adults in their lives.

Young folks do not learn how to read a ruler unless they are in a technical field.

Rarely does anyone actually build models or other items anymore.

Vocational programs are often dumping grounds problem kids.

Assigning kids with severe math & reading deficiencies to programs where these

are essential . ie Aviation Classes.

Guidance Counselors and Administrators that have no clue regarding the trades.

Nor do they want to.

And you blame the kids?
 
Interesting choice of verb: blame. Did you suspect some other reason?
Not an iota of evidence, but the current situation discussed in that article indicates that there is a reason airlines would like voters to complain to their reps to get more pilots into cockpits.
 
Interesting choice of verb: blame. Did you suspect some other reason?
“Crew delay” (see below) is what they said. What is unsaid is that United apparently does not anticipate and arrange coverage in cases of crew delay. And the same thing happened to my kids in February when Alaska Airlines cancelled their flight out of KSBP.

Complicating the situation is that United offers only two flights a day out of SAF. Don’t recall how many Alaska flights there are out of SBP.

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IMHO - Hours were not a factor here. Training and professionalism IS.

There is a source of much more mature people out there that the FAA won't consider. That's the Navy and USAF tactical navigators (WSO's etc). I was a Naval Flight Officer in the EA-6B for 2300 hours. In the right seat of the jet I did all the comms, the navigation, backed up the pilot as a "co-pilot without a stick" and then ran some tactical duties (comm jammer, crypto, missile control panel). Even in the back seats when running the ESM, Jamming and Missile targeting mission you were paying attention to safety of flight. in the EA-6B, A-6 and S-3 we even had Navy instrument ratings since we could guide the approach and assist in acquiring the runway environment so could fly to dual piloted mins.

I went back and did my private/instrument to learn the stick and rudder skills after retiring ( I really missed flying) and I found I had far more SA and experience than your average instructor. They had maybe 1000 hours, but what they really had was 1 hour a 1000 times.

If the FAA had been willing to acknowledge and given us some level of experience of those of us that flew in similar environments (F-111, F-15E, F-14, F/A-18F/G, EA-6B, S-3, A-6 sorts) there is no doubt would have gotten whatever hours I needed in GA and pursued an airline career.

I just retired at 59 from my post-Navy engineering career but following in my Grandfather's footsteps who flew for 30 years an Eastern pilot was what I really would have wanted to do.
 
There is a source of much more mature people out there that the FAA won't consider. That's the Navy and USAF tactical navigators (WSO's etc). I was a Naval Flight Officer in the EA-6B for 2300 hours. In the right seat of the jet I did all the comms, the navigation, backed up the pilot as a "co-pilot without a stick" and then ran some tactical duties (comm jammer, crypto, missile control panel). Even in the back seats when running the ESM, Jamming and Missile targeting mission you were paying attention to safety of flight. in the EA-6B, A-6 and S-3 we even had Navy instrument ratings since we could guide the approach and assist in acquiring the runway environment so could fly to dual piloted mins.

I went back and did my private/instrument to learn the stick and rudder skills after retiring ( I really missed flying) and I found I had far more SA and experience than your average instructor. They had maybe 1000 hours, but what they really had was 1 hour a 1000 times.

If the FAA had been willing to acknowledge and given us some level of experience of those of us that flew in similar environments (F-111, F-15E, F-14, F/A-18F/G, EA-6B, S-3, A-6 sorts) there is no doubt would have gotten whatever hours I needed in GA and pursued an airline career.

I just retired at 59 from my post-Navy engineering career but following in my Grandfather's footsteps who flew for 30 years an Eastern pilot was what I really would have wanted to do.
You could still do it, If you can get a class 1 medical. Depending on the flight experience you have (hours, especially night and x-country) it may be a longer road, but doable. Maybe all you need to some multi-engine time...then its just a matter of getting it. Maybe you'll need gobs of hours...then you can do what the kids do...get the ratings, become a flight instructor and make it work. Even if it takes 3 years, where you'll be 62, you can still do it...maybe not at a major, but still. Think about it.
 
Too late for me to do that transition now. I will consider some commercial flying perhaps but we're in the process of building, and moving to, the retirement house in NH in the next month so life is full. I'll be happy flying the Archer and looking at a multi rating as I know a guy who does the rating then will rent block time in his Seneca.
 
When covid hit and the airlines started offering retirement to many the stage was set. There was no corporate thought process of the future.
 
When covid hit and the airlines started offering retirement to many the stage was set. There was no corporate thought process of the future.
I would say the corporate thought process was the bottom dollar, and attempting to minimize the losses to keep stockholders happy.
 
 

 
Any pilot shortage seems to be ending.

 
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